KS3 English Curriculum Map

Sorting the September Stress: Beyond’s KS3 English Curriculum Map

Tick a job off your to-do list with this comprehensive KS3 English Curriculum Map, resourcing every Key Stage 3 lesson from the beginning of Year Seven, to the end of Year Nine. Continue reading Sorting the September Stress: Beyond’s KS3 English Curriculum Map

Teacher Mental Health: Reactive, not Proactive

While a greater focus and need for mental health provisions has obviously become increasingly prominent in recent years, we ask whether or not steps could be made to make mental health provisions for teachers, especially NQTs having a rough time, … Continue reading Teacher Mental Health: Reactive, not Proactive

4 April Fools’ Day Pranks Teachers Can Play

April Fools’ Day is a day of wariness on all fronts. You can’t believe anything you read, hear or see and those excuses your students offer for no homework or being late are dealt with even greater scrutiny. That being … Continue reading 4 April Fools’ Day Pranks Teachers Can Play

Things You Should Never Say to a Teacher

Understanding teaching is nigh-on impossible until you do it for yourself. Even the spouses/partners of teachers don’t fully understand its intricacies – but passing comment is easy, but here are a few things you should really, really avoid saying to a teacher. ‘All those holidays must be nice!’ Holidays are amazing. Being able to take a holiday when you want it is just that bit more amazing. Here’s why. Imagine lazing on a beautiful, tropical beach in your swimming shorts/bikini and suddenly hearing a familiar “Hello Sir/Miss! What are you doing here?” as if the child is surprised you’ve been let … Continue reading Things You Should Never Say to a Teacher

What’s Your Achilles’ Heel?

Though secondary school teachers are of course experts in their chosen fields, it’s probably fair to state that most of us have an Achilles heel. Mine is poetry. Fellow English teachers extol the emotional connection that they had with a poem, while the emotional connection I typically experience is deep confusion. The Cox Report (1989), which helped to establish the national curriculum as we know it, brilliantly described poetry as ‘language made strange’, though chances are its author foresaw the students finding it alien rather than those charged with teaching it. Remarkably, the poetry essays I wrote at university all … Continue reading What’s Your Achilles’ Heel?

Time Is Relative in Teaching

In the words of the bard, we are time’s subjects. If there’s one thing to be said of time, it’s that time definitely works differently for teachers. Sometimes, time slows down… With half term but a few days away, you might have noticed a strange phenomenon. Time is, in fact, slowing down. Each hour-long lesson actually takes somewhere in the region of 3 or 4 hours and that commute that you could’ve sworn takes 34 minutes takes approximately 2 hours on the way in and on the way home. You might notice that this particular pattern of time dilation occurs when … Continue reading Time Is Relative in Teaching